The Case of the 4,000 Twitter Followers Who Don’t Care

Image courtesy of Paurian

Image courtesy of Paurian

This is the Case of the 4,000 Twitter Followers Who Don’t Care - and why 4,000 followers means nothing without engagement.

I recently took on a new client that wants to leverage its existing social media assets (Facebook Page/Fans, Twitter followers) to drive more visits to the website. This company has been building a social media presence for over a year, and is unhappy with the lack of website visits resulting from social media.

I was told that the Facebook Group was active with almost 500 fans, and that the Twitter account had over 4,000 followers.  I was also briefed that, though there was not a lot of online fan feedback, the Twitter account included some committed followers. The highest priority for the client was to figure out why social media was not driving more people to the website – and come up with a better strategy.

I took on this challenge, and want to share a few observations about why social media isn’t working for this client:

Case Observation #1:

The most important number isn’t the number of followers, it’s the number of engaged followers.

4,000 Twitter followers seems like a lot. But how many really care about your organization? How many are willing to act on its behalf?

I evaluated “the 4,000 followers” on Twitter and “almost 500 fans” of the Facebook Page. I used Twerpscan, Twittalyzer, Twazzup, and Tweetmeme to analyze the Twitter asset, and discovered:

  • almost 400 of their Twitter followers were pure spammers
  • no one cared what the client was tweeting, and…
  • most of the retweets were from twitter profiles related to the company
  • the company did not engage in conversation online, and rarely thanked retweeters
  • there was absolutely no Twitter strategy

What I discovered was that, of the 4,000+ followers, only three were truly interested enough in what the organization was tweeting. Three.

Twitter utilizes the concept of social media karma: give and give and then others will give back. This company didn’t offer help, advice, support or anything else personal.  Obviously, Twitter did not drive people to the website – no one cared enough about the company to go there.

Of the 400+ Facebook fans, most didn’t care enough to “like” a Wall post. The ones that did comment or “like” a post were often friends of the CEO or employees. All the posted was to its Facebook Page was company stories or related news. Of the 400+ fans, only one was an (unrelated to the company) engaged fan! Facebook drove little traffic to the website, which again is not surprising.

Case Observation #2:

Be wary when the CEO or Executive Director isn’t using social media on behalf of the organization.

This CEO was absolutely unwilling to be personally involved in using social media for the company. This is indicative of a CEO that does not understand the basic principles of social media. It’s critical that everyone in the organization have some direct contact with social media. An Executive Director that isn’t directly responsible for some piece of the social media is missing important information by not connecting with stakeholders directly. Not every CEO has to be responsible, but he/she should be intimately involved with the social media activities, and understand the basic principles of social media.

This CEO was using social media to “drive numbers to the website,” which completely misunderstands the basic fundamentals of social media. They are:

Engage with people first, create relationships, then move them to act.

Case Observation #3:

Their social media sites offer no real value to fans and followers

The company hadn’t taken the time to figure out what people were interested in reading on their social sites. Since the organization was not actually creating individual relationships with its fans, then it had to offer compelling and relevant news and data.  However, it wasn’t giving followers information that mattered to the followers. Not surprisingly, no one wanted to visit the website to find out more.

Case Observation #4:

You need a strategy for each and every social media platform.

Their overall social media strategy consisted of posting news and information. This is an appropriate strategy for social bookmarking sites like StumbleUpon and Digg, but not at all for social networking sites such as Facebook and Twitter. Additionally, the company usually posted the same information on both Twitter and Facebook. Fans of both sites were not even receiving unique value or reward for following the company in two places.

It’s important to realize that no two communities are the same online. Each has its own rules, expectations, and needs. You need an engagement strategy for each one of these communities. The strategy should consider the qualities of each social media platform, the needs of followers, how to best engage, and what your organization can offer its followers in terms of both engagement and value.

It’s Elementary, My Dear Watson

Social media is a tool to help your company meet its goals. But it’s more than that: if you aren’t using these tools properly, then it doesn’t matter how many fans, followers, or linkedin connections you have. They won’t care enough to do anything for your organization or company.

This case illustrates that it’s not about the number of fans and followers. It’s about the engagement. Create a strategy that brings your organization engaged followers and real relationships.

4,000 followers means nothing without engagement. And it never will.




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  • http://www.volunteerhoward.org/ Mickey Gomez

    Fantastic post, Debra! Compelling observations, insights, and suggestions for improvement. Thank you for including strategies to address the challenges, too.

    I’ve provided an introduction to social media training for our local agencies, and while most of them “get it”, I struggle with a handful of leaders who identify themselves as “too busy” to learn or use social media. Another challenge surrounds their strategy, which invariably is to “drive people to our website” or “promote our brand” (ie: solely to “push” information out, little focus on engagement).

    I am hopeful that sharing your article with them might encourage them to reconsider their overall approach to social media. Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Mickey, I do hope the article is useful. Please check back and let me know how they react. Maybe that’s a blog post for you to write! I often do trainings for nomprofits, and the ones that are all about “driving traffic to the website” or won’t participate in social media are ALWAYS the ones whose social media profiles aren’t working. And then, of course, they ask me why. Sigh. It’s a challenge to move people from the old “information sharing” to “engagement.” I’m glad you found this helpful!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.volunteerhoward.org Mickey Gomez

    Fantastic post, Debra! Compelling observations, insights, and suggestions for improvement. Thank you for including strategies to address the challenges, too.

    I’ve provided an introduction to social media training for our local agencies, and while most of them “get it”, I struggle with a handful of leaders who identify themselves as “too busy” to learn or use social media. Another challenge surrounds their strategy, which invariably is to “drive people to our website” or “promote our brand” (ie: solely to “push” information out, little focus on engagement).

    I am hopeful that sharing your article with them might encourage them to reconsider their overall approach to social media. Thank you!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Mickey, I do hope the article is useful. Please check back and let me know how they react. Maybe that’s a blog post for you to write! I often do trainings for nomprofits, and the ones that are all about “driving traffic to the website” or won’t participate in social media are ALWAYS the ones whose social media profiles aren’t working. And then, of course, they ask me why. Sigh. It’s a challenge to move people from the old “information sharing” to “engagement.” I’m glad you found this helpful!

    [Reply]

  • http://aquestionofperspective.com/ Elisa Hebert

    Debra: This is great. It’s clear and articulate, and I’m sending the link to some clients who need to hear just this exactly.

    The goal isn’t how many followers or fans, it’s how many *engaged* followers or fans.

    Well said.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Thanks, Elisa! Engagement motivates, not information. I absolutely agree! Hope the link is helpful for your clients, too!

    [Reply]

  • http://aquestionofperspective.com/ Elisa Hebert

    Debra: This is great. It’s clear and articulate, and I’m sending the link to some clients who need to hear just this exactly.

    The goal isn’t how many followers or fans, it’s how many *engaged* followers or fans.

    Well said.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Thanks, Elisa! Engagement motivates, not information. I absolutely agree! Hope the link is helpful for your clients, too!

    [Reply]

  • http://fundraisingcoach.com/ Marc A. Pitman

    This is great! I’ve been trying to forcefully tell nonprofits to be SOCIAL with social media. Thank you so much for clearly showing how Twitter and Facebook can be analyzed. This is invaluable.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Marc, it’s quite a challenge to figure out how to move nonprofits towards being more social with social media. I know from experience! I think real engagement analysis is the critical part of understanding why the socializing is important – we know it moves people to act, and they aren’t really motivated without that engagement. Glad this case study was valuable for you.

    [Reply]

  • http://fundraisingcoach.com Marc A. Pitman

    This is great! I’ve been trying to forcefully tell nonprofits to be SOCIAL with social media. Thank you so much for clearly showing how Twitter and Facebook can be analyzed. This is invaluable.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Marc, it’s quite a challenge to figure out how to move nonprofits towards being more social with social media. I know from experience! I think real engagement analysis is the critical part of understanding why the socializing is important – we know it moves people to act, and they aren’t really motivated without that engagement. Glad this case study was valuable for you.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.loft107.com/ Tally

    I truly enjoyed this post! thank you for bringing it to my attention.

    I think that one of the key issues that you hit on, is that some organizations are still thinking of social media as a numbers game.

    Andwhile social media is a part of the overall marketing and therefore, should yield measurable results the way to achieve the results is by treating people as people and engaging with them on a personal level

    so once again, thanks for the post

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Tally – you’re so right! People still think of marketing as “a numbers game,” and social media is an altogether differnt type of marketing. For the corporation that is used to seeing immediate return on investment (from PPC ads, online vouchers, etc.), social media is a really hard mind-set. Unfortunately, it is quite difficult to to move these types of companies to think about “delayed return on investment” via social media and social media marketing.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.loft107.com Tally

    I truly enjoyed this post! thank you for bringing it to my attention.

    I think that one of the key issues that you hit on, is that some organizations are still thinking of social media as a numbers game.

    Andwhile social media is a part of the overall marketing and therefore, should yield measurable results the way to achieve the results is by treating people as people and engaging with them on a personal level

    so once again, thanks for the post

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Tally – you’re so right! People still think of marketing as “a numbers game,” and social media is an altogether differnt type of marketing. For the corporation that is used to seeing immediate return on investment (from PPC ads, online vouchers, etc.), social media is a really hard mind-set. Unfortunately, it is quite difficult to to move these types of companies to think about “delayed return on investment” via social media and social media marketing.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.causeaholic.com/ Steve Drake

    Wow. This is a seminal blog! Really of value to all who are working on social media strategies.

    Some observations:

    1) 400 spammers in your followers? Why would someone active on Twitter not be blocking spammers as you go? If you are serious about Twitter, you should be deleting as you go. Not just spammers but also followers (and people you are following) who aren’t provding mutually beneficial content.

    2) Great line: Twitter / social media is about “give and given and then others will give back.” I recently had a colleague post a blog on why he was resigning his Twitter account. I went back to his profile. In six months, he had sent one Tweet. Well, who will miss him when he resigns Twitter. My morale: don’e be a One Tweet Wonder!

    3) Yes, the CEO / Executive Director should be personally invited in some aspect of social media. In my case, while I have Facebook and LinkedIn accounts, I’ve put my energy into Twitter. Others on our team have focused on other SM platforms.

    4) Use strategy to determine platforms. While I love Twitter, we have just guided one of our association clients to a social media strategy where LinkedIn is the main platform. Why? Because our research showed a majority of their target audience were already on LinkedIn. Now, they just have to work to provide valuable content and engage them

    Debra, this is a wonderful post. It will be on my “must read list” for clients and staff trying to understand social media. Thanks!

    Steve

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Steve, your comment offers some really great insight – thanks. I’ll try to respond in kind –
    1. The 400 spammers – yep, that was a shocker. This company auto-followed every single follower, so of course there were spammers. The surprise was that no one was blocking the spammers. However, in retrospect, given the company’s approach towards social media as a numbers game (the more followers, the more people might visit the website thinking), it’s not so surprising that it hadn’t culled out the spammers. The company did allow me to weed them out, however.
    2. I appreciate you sharing that assign the social media media throughout your company. This is one good example of how an organization can share the work and the benefit of social media for the company.
    3. Great reminder to look at the organization’s needs first, and choose appropriate platforms. I, too, just recommended Linkedin over Facebook for a company because it is by far and away the best social networking site for that company.

    Great comments, and insights, Steve. Thanks for sharing!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.causeaholic.com Steve Drake

    Wow. This is a seminal blog! Really of value to all who are working on social media strategies.

    Some observations:

    1) 400 spammers in your followers? Why would someone active on Twitter not be blocking spammers as you go? If you are serious about Twitter, you should be deleting as you go. Not just spammers but also followers (and people you are following) who aren’t provding mutually beneficial content.

    2) Great line: Twitter / social media is about “give and given and then others will give back.” I recently had a colleague post a blog on why he was resigning his Twitter account. I went back to his profile. In six months, he had sent one Tweet. Well, who will miss him when he resigns Twitter. My morale: don’e be a One Tweet Wonder!

    3) Yes, the CEO / Executive Director should be personally invited in some aspect of social media. In my case, while I have Facebook and LinkedIn accounts, I’ve put my energy into Twitter. Others on our team have focused on other SM platforms.

    4) Use strategy to determine platforms. While I love Twitter, we have just guided one of our association clients to a social media strategy where LinkedIn is the main platform. Why? Because our research showed a majority of their target audience were already on LinkedIn. Now, they just have to work to provide valuable content and engage them

    Debra, this is a wonderful post. It will be on my “must read list” for clients and staff trying to understand social media. Thanks!

    Steve

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Steve, your comment offers some really great insight – thanks. I’ll try to respond in kind –
    1. The 400 spammers – yep, that was a shocker. This company auto-followed every single follower, so of course there were spammers. The surprise was that no one was blocking the spammers. However, in retrospect, given the company’s approach towards social media as a numbers game (the more followers, the more people might visit the website thinking), it’s not so surprising that it hadn’t culled out the spammers. The company did allow me to weed them out, however.
    2. I appreciate you sharing that assign the social media media throughout your company. This is one good example of how an organization can share the work and the benefit of social media for the company.
    3. Great reminder to look at the organization’s needs first, and choose appropriate platforms. I, too, just recommended Linkedin over Facebook for a company because it is by far and away the best social networking site for that company.

    Great comments, and insights, Steve. Thanks for sharing!

    [Reply]

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  • http://jeffhurtblog.com/ Jeff Hurt

    Debra:

    Great post and applies to many nonprofits and corporations.

    I liked your observation about the CEO not being willing to be involved in social media. When a CEO or Executive Director is not willing to be involved with social media, that’s like saying the CEO is not willing to spend time with a customer! Do they ignore their customers or members who call, fax or email them? No, and they should not ignore new communication channels either.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Jeff – this seems to be the point that resonates most with readers. I love your analogy about the CEO who isn’t willing to be involved with social media is like a CEO not willing to spend time with a customer. I don’t think this can be stated any more strongly or accurately – it’s a wonderful analogy. Thanks for adding your comment!

    [Reply]

  • http://jeffhurtblog.com Jeff Hurt

    Debra:

    Great post and applies to many nonprofits and corporations.

    I liked your observation about the CEO not being willing to be involved in social media. When a CEO or Executive Director is not willing to be involved with social media, that’s like saying the CEO is not willing to spend time with a customer! Do they ignore their customers or members who call, fax or email them? No, and they should not ignore new communication channels either.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Jeff – this seems to be the point that resonates most with readers. I love your analogy about the CEO who isn’t willing to be involved with social media is like a CEO not willing to spend time with a customer. I don’t think this can be stated any more strongly or accurately – it’s a wonderful analogy. Thanks for adding your comment!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.sonncom.com/ Tom

    Point made very well, Debra!
    Let me add to #4: There is definitely a need for strategy and concept in SM marketing. More than 90% of SM users think that companies should engage in SM and 80% think, companies should interact in SM.
    But companies find it hard to develop a strategy.

    Some of the steps might be:

    1. monitoring of the status quo
    2. content decision
    3. social media marketing strategy
    4. developing the social media marketing concept
    5. social media optimization of content and interfaces
    6. budget
    7. organization of measurement

    [Reply]

  • http://www.sonncom.com Tom

    Point made very well, Debra!
    Let me add to #4: There is definitely a need for strategy and concept in SM marketing. More than 90% of SM users think that companies should engage in SM and 80% think, companies should interact in SM.
    But companies find it hard to develop a strategy.

    Some of the steps might be:

    1. monitoring of the status quo
    2. content decision
    3. social media marketing strategy
    4. developing the social media marketing concept
    5. social media optimization of content and interfaces
    6. budget
    7. organization of measurement

    [Reply]

  • http://illuminea.com/ Miriam Schwab

    Excellent post Debra! Such good observations. Did you manage to convince the client to change their approach to social media, or is there no hope for them?

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Miriam, thanks for stopping by. As you know, working with clients is sometimes challenging when they have a different idea about work implementation than you (the consultant) does. I do think there’s hope, but I am honestly not sure of the ultimate outcome. Perhaps this is a good idea for a follow-up blog post.

    [Reply]

  • http://illuminea.com Miriam Schwab

    Excellent post Debra! Such good observations. Did you manage to convince the client to change their approach to social media, or is there no hope for them?

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Miriam, thanks for stopping by. As you know, working with clients is sometimes challenging when they have a different idea about work implementation than you (the consultant) does. I do think there’s hope, but I am honestly not sure of the ultimate outcome. Perhaps this is a good idea for a follow-up blog post.

    [Reply]

  • http://renareich.com/ Rena

    “Engage with people first, create relationships, then move them to act.”

    This is so fundamental, that you would think that no one would need to actually write it down. It’s surprising how many people take it for granted. This goes back to Emotional Intelligence – if I’m your friend I’m much more likely to do something for you.

    For a lot of CEOs, Twitter is a buzz word. Their companies need to be using Twitter and other Social Media sites, but they just don’t get it. I’m not sure that they need to be involved in Social Media themselves, as long as they realize it’s a valuable tool, and get out of the way for the people who do know what they are doing. It’s a big problem is when they don’t value what staff members are doing to engage potential customers, and think that it’s a waste of time, but need to do it anyway because everyone is doing it. After all, what can anyone do in 140 characters or less ;)

    Great post, Debra!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Rena, good point about Emotional Intelligence. Social media is, after all, built upon the basics of being social. Listen, give, empathize, laugh – all the parts that make someone want to give back.

    I think you are right that the CEO doesn’t have to be implementing the social media himself/herself, as long as he/she is intimately involved. However, CEOs that Tweet, manage their Facebook Walls, involve themselves heavily in association networks – those CEOS are closest to understanding their customers’ needs, and are able to modify the organization’s messages quickly in order to respond to changing needs. CEOs that are involved are also publicly recognized brand spokespeople – which is great PR for the company – and send the message that the company cares, is listening, and wants to really engage with its customers. Yes, the CEO doesn’t have to be personally involved, but I do think it helps the company in immeasurable ways.

    [Reply]

  • http://renareich.com Rena

    “Engage with people first, create relationships, then move them to act.”

    This is so fundamental, that you would think that no one would need to actually write it down. It’s surprising how many people take it for granted. This goes back to Emotional Intelligence – if I’m your friend I’m much more likely to do something for you.

    For a lot of CEOs, Twitter is a buzz word. Their companies need to be using Twitter and other Social Media sites, but they just don’t get it. I’m not sure that they need to be involved in Social Media themselves, as long as they realize it’s a valuable tool, and get out of the way for the people who do know what they are doing. It’s a big problem is when they don’t value what staff members are doing to engage potential customers, and think that it’s a waste of time, but need to do it anyway because everyone is doing it. After all, what can anyone do in 140 characters or less ;)

    Great post, Debra!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Rena, good point about Emotional Intelligence. Social media is, after all, built upon the basics of being social. Listen, give, empathize, laugh – all the parts that make someone want to give back.

    I think you are right that the CEO doesn’t have to be implementing the social media himself/herself, as long as he/she is intimately involved. However, CEOs that Tweet, manage their Facebook Walls, involve themselves heavily in association networks – those CEOS are closest to understanding their customers’ needs, and are able to modify the organization’s messages quickly in order to respond to changing needs. CEOs that are involved are also publicly recognized brand spokespeople – which is great PR for the company – and send the message that the company cares, is listening, and wants to really engage with its customers. Yes, the CEO doesn’t have to be personally involved, but I do think it helps the company in immeasurable ways.

    [Reply]

  • http://agroovyweb.com Isman Tanuri

    Hi Debra, what a great post! My sentiments exactly on corporate Twitter accounts that are practically blasting out nothing but ads. It is really the emphasis on ‘social’ instead of ‘media’.

    On another note, without top-down conviction by senior management, it is really tough to drive and achieve value through these social media efforts. I am of the belief that a certain level of openness and transparency must be achieved before any social media efforts can be attempted. In this case, an unwilling CEO, who is not ready to share, completely misses the point. As always, humanising the brand is crucial!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Isman- wonderful point about top-town conviction by senior management. This is, as you rightly point out, really important, and helps to humanize the brand and engage the brand with consumers. Thanks so much for your comment and adding to the conversation!

    [Reply]

  • Isman Tanuri (@groovygenie)

    Hi Debra, what a great post! My sentiments exactly on corporate Twitter accounts that are practically blasting out nothing but ads. It is really the emphasis on ‘social’ instead of ‘media’.

    On another note, without top-down conviction by senior management, it is really tough to drive and achieve value through these social media efforts. I am of the belief that a certain level of openness and transparency must be achieved before any social media efforts can be attempted. In this case, an unwilling CEO, who is not ready to share, completely misses the point. As always, humanising the brand is crucial!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Isman- wonderful point about top-town conviction by senior management. This is, as you rightly point out, really important, and helps to humanize the brand and engage the brand with consumers. Thanks so much for your comment and adding to the conversation!

    [Reply]

  • Reg Saddler

    Great post, I couldn’t agree more. With close to 100k followers, the best I could hope for is say 20 percent of my followers to take an active interest in my content.

    But you never know :)

    That’s why I apply my favorite nerdy Star Trek axiom to twitter:

    The phrase “Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations”

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Reg, well, I’m one of your close to 100K followers! I think it’s a hard number to follow, and this brings up a whole other conversation about saturation point, Dunbar’s Number, etc. In fact, it’s a great point to consider discussing – how does a brand with 100K followers, or an organization, really engage? Good food for thought! Do you have further thoughts or best practices you want to share here about how to really engage with so many followers? Thanks for stopping by and broadening this conversation.

    [Reply]

  • Reg Saddler

    Great post, I couldn’t agree more. With close to 100k followers, the best I could hope for is say 20 percent of my followers to take an active interest in my content.

    But you never know :)

    That’s why I apply my favorite nerdy Star Trek axiom to twitter:

    The phrase “Infinite Diversity in Infinite Combinations”

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Reg, well, I’m one of your close to 100K followers! I think it’s a hard number to follow, and this brings up a whole other conversation about saturation point, Dunbar’s Number, etc. In fact, it’s a great point to consider discussing – how does a brand with 100K followers, or an organization, really engage? Good food for thought! Do you have further thoughts or best practices you want to share here about how to really engage with so many followers? Thanks for stopping by and broadening this conversation.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.iyazam.com/ Hillel

    Excellent article that every start-up CEO must read! I am finding this same problem with many young CEO’s who just received nice amounts of money from investors and are now all excited about marketing on social media.
    I recently heard someone say: “Its better to have 50 relevant followers on twitter who you interact with then 5000 followers who are not relevant”

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Hillel – thanks for adding the perspective about young CEOs that are ready to start marketing with their newly-found investors’ funds. I always say that the first three months of social media are just about engagement – hard for a cash-strapped, or new start up to always agree to, as you probably know. Good point! Thanks for commenting and stopping by :)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.iyazam.com/ Hillel

    Excellent article that every start-up CEO must read! I am finding this same problem with many young CEO’s who just received nice amounts of money from investors and are now all excited about marketing on social media.
    I recently heard someone say: “Its better to have 50 relevant followers on twitter who you interact with then 5000 followers who are not relevant”

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Hillel – thanks for adding the perspective about young CEOs that are ready to start marketing with their newly-found investors’ funds. I always say that the first three months of social media are just about engagement – hard for a cash-strapped, or new start up to always agree to, as you probably know. Good point! Thanks for commenting and stopping by :)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.writingthoughts.com/ Laura Spencer

    You are so on target with this! This is how I’ve felt about followers the whole time.

    I’m barraged by offers from so-called experts who claim that they will show me how to get [X] followers on twitter. My response – not interested. That’s because I know that the robofollowers that they will provide will mostly be uninterested in what I tweet.

    I’d much rather have a smaller number of followers who are genuinely interested in being part of my community.

    (That’s also why I don’t automatically follow anyone who follows me. In fact, I routinely encourage new followers to join the conversation so that I can “meet” them.)

    This post caught my eye and peaked my interest. I’m going to look you up and start following your tweets!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Laura,
    Good point about not automatically following twitterers. One of the things that this organization does is auto-follow back every twitterer that follows their company’s twitter profile. They also send out automatic direct messages to welcome new followers. As you astutely pointed out, most of these people are not interested in what the organization has to say, and they are (mostly) uninterested in becoming part of the community or conversation. Lots of people offer you solutions to gain “x” number of followers, but they are worth exactly the effort you put into getting them! I look forward to conversing with you more on twitter!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.writingthoughts.com Laura Spencer

    You are so on target with this! This is how I’ve felt about followers the whole time.

    I’m barraged by offers from so-called experts who claim that they will show me how to get [X] followers on twitter. My response – not interested. That’s because I know that the robofollowers that they will provide will mostly be uninterested in what I tweet.

    I’d much rather have a smaller number of followers who are genuinely interested in being part of my community.

    (That’s also why I don’t automatically follow anyone who follows me. In fact, I routinely encourage new followers to join the conversation so that I can “meet” them.)

    This post caught my eye and peaked my interest. I’m going to look you up and start following your tweets!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Laura,
    Good point about not automatically following twitterers. One of the things that this organization does is auto-follow back every twitterer that follows their company’s twitter profile. They also send out automatic direct messages to welcome new followers. As you astutely pointed out, most of these people are not interested in what the organization has to say, and they are (mostly) uninterested in becoming part of the community or conversation. Lots of people offer you solutions to gain “x” number of followers, but they are worth exactly the effort you put into getting them! I look forward to conversing with you more on twitter!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.quernzy.com/ Valerie Querns

    Very insightful! Next time I bring up “social media strategy” with a company, I will call it “engagement strategy”. =)

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Valerie – thanks! I call social media an “engagement strategy” because that is what it is all about, in my opinion. Without engagement, it’s just a marketing strategy. Look forward to hearing how your companies react to the new terminology – please stop by again and let us know!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.quernzy.com Valerie Querns

    Very insightful! Next time I bring up “social media strategy” with a company, I will call it “engagement strategy”. =)

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Valerie – thanks! I call social media an “engagement strategy” because that is what it is all about, in my opinion. Without engagement, it’s just a marketing strategy. Look forward to hearing how your companies react to the new terminology – please stop by again and let us know!

    [Reply]

  • http://mod-lab.com/ Seth Giammanco

    Another great post Debra thanks. Really illustrates what I think is great and exciting about social media as well as very hard. The goal as you say should be relationships, connections. Managing relationships with people is hard. Requires active engagement and experimentation to find ways to keep such a broad audience connected to you as you note so well.

    I would imagine this is especially challenging for companies/organizations who may have their primary social media goal of web site visitor traffic.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Seth – nice to see you here! In the blog post case, it is a company that is particularly focused on website visitor traffic. I firmly believe that social media can drive significant traffic to a website, but a company does have to put the time and energy into an engagement strategy. As you mention, it requires investment of time and energy and experimentation. I think that is where companies strapped for cash, or used to thinking about marketing as traditional online marketing struggle and fail with social media. They don’t have the time/staff/energy. It’s tough to find those resources, but I do not think it’s useful to enter into social media if a company isn’t going to commit to an engagement strategy.

    [Reply]

  • http://mod-lab.com Seth Giammanco

    Another great post Debra thanks. Really illustrates what I think is great and exciting about social media as well as very hard. The goal as you say should be relationships, connections. Managing relationships with people is hard. Requires active engagement and experimentation to find ways to keep such a broad audience connected to you as you note so well.

    I would imagine this is especially challenging for companies/organizations who may have their primary social media goal of web site visitor traffic.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Seth – nice to see you here! In the blog post case, it is a company that is particularly focused on website visitor traffic. I firmly believe that social media can drive significant traffic to a website, but a company does have to put the time and energy into an engagement strategy. As you mention, it requires investment of time and energy and experimentation. I think that is where companies strapped for cash, or used to thinking about marketing as traditional online marketing struggle and fail with social media. They don’t have the time/staff/energy. It’s tough to find those resources, but I do not think it’s useful to enter into social media if a company isn’t going to commit to an engagement strategy.

    [Reply]

  • http://allenmireles.com Allen Mireles

    This is a wonderful post and the resulting comments are also well worth reading. You have introduced me to two new Twitter tools as well.

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  • Glenn

    This may be the best post I’ve read in years, certainly on the topic of social media. Well done. I’m going to tweet it and link to it from two different blogs.

    I’ll be reading….

    Glenn

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Thanks for the links, Glenn! I really appreciate your kind words…

    [Reply]

  • Allen Mireles

    This is a wonderful post and the resulting comments are also well worth reading. You have introduced me to two new Twitter tools as well.

    Thanks!

    [Reply]

  • Glenn

    This may be the best post I’ve read in years, certainly on the topic of social media. Well done. I’m going to tweet it and link to it from two different blogs.

    I’ll be reading….

    Glenn

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Thanks for the links, Glenn! I really appreciate your kind words…

    [Reply]

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  • http://www.facebook.com/globallanguageproject Noah Goodman

    Debra,

    Thanks for this post. You pointed out that the company was posting the same thing on Facebook and Twitter, I wonder whether you have any suggestions about the different strategies that organizations ought to use with Twitter versus Facebook.

    Noah

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Noah, Twitter and Facebook are used differently, so I’d start there. I always think of Facebook as the organization’s opportunity to combine website with discussion – so any information that is interesting for discussion and creates opportunity to move people to action is a great way to think about your Facebook Page. Twitter is much more about sharing and supporting. Think of Twitter as creating incredibly devoted friends who can instantly send an email to all of their friends on your organization’s behalf. Think of Facebook as the living room – ideas are thrown out and discussed, rejected or accepted, and people leave the discussion with lots of food for thought (and hopefully motivated to do something). It is acceptable to cross-post, but they are not the same social networks and the users act differently on each one – so tailor the discussions and content to how your users want to interact with you on each network.

    I bet others have thoughts about this – please chime in! What are your strategies for using Facebook vs. Twitter? Noah, please check back and tell us how your organization uses both of these networks.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.facebook.com/globallanguageproject Noah Goodman

    Debra,

    Thanks for this post. You pointed out that the company was posting the same thing on Facebook and Twitter, I wonder whether you have any suggestions about the different strategies that organizations ought to use with Twitter versus Facebook.

    Noah

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Noah, Twitter and Facebook are used differently, so I’d start there. I always think of Facebook as the organization’s opportunity to combine website with discussion – so any information that is interesting for discussion and creates opportunity to move people to action is a great way to think about your Facebook Page. Twitter is much more about sharing and supporting. Think of Twitter as creating incredibly devoted friends who can instantly send an email to all of their friends on your organization’s behalf. Think of Facebook as the living room – ideas are thrown out and discussed, rejected or accepted, and people leave the discussion with lots of food for thought (and hopefully motivated to do something). It is acceptable to cross-post, but they are not the same social networks and the users act differently on each one – so tailor the discussions and content to how your users want to interact with you on each network.

    I bet others have thoughts about this – please chime in! What are your strategies for using Facebook vs. Twitter? Noah, please check back and tell us how your organization uses both of these networks.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.tallentagency.com/ Jan Tallent

    What a wonderful article, I am going to share it with my almost 6,000 followers who DO engage and interact.

    I dumped almost 1,000 who did nothing but fill up my stream to the point I could no longer connect with anyone who did not reply to me or send the tweet to me – by doing this and commenting on what I had done and WHY, it started lots of great conversations and had people who had been only reasonably active start contributing more.

    Bravo!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Jan- what a great comment! Your comment offers a great suggestion for how to cull out the non-contributing followers and parameters for creating a Twitter community from which you, and your followers, benefit. I really appreciate you sharing your experience, and actions. Bravo to you for having the commitment to engagement!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.tallentagency.com Jan Tallent

    What a wonderful article, I am going to share it with my almost 6,000 followers who DO engage and interact.

    I dumped almost 1,000 who did nothing but fill up my stream to the point I could no longer connect with anyone who did not reply to me or send the tweet to me – by doing this and commenting on what I had done and WHY, it started lots of great conversations and had people who had been only reasonably active start contributing more.

    Bravo!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Jan- what a great comment! Your comment offers a great suggestion for how to cull out the non-contributing followers and parameters for creating a Twitter community from which you, and your followers, benefit. I really appreciate you sharing your experience, and actions. Bravo to you for having the commitment to engagement!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.facebook.com/globallanguageproject Noah Goodman

    Debra,

    Thanks a bunch for the reply, this has been a question on my mind for a bit now.

    As for how we use FB and Twitter at Global Language Project (my org), we have a Facebook account but not Twitter. We just recently launched our social media campaign and decided to take things one platform at a time so that we could focus on doing a good job at each and we also decided to focus on the objectives rather than the tools (ie not taking up specific tools until we have a specific rationale for it is going to help us advance our objective/mission).

    We currently use our FB page to post articles related to our cause and updates about what is going on with our organization, but we’re in a constant discussion about what else we can be doing to make it richer and more engaging. I really liked your description of FB as a website with discussion. I feel like it pegged how I’ve been feeling about FB lately. Having FB and nothing else has been difficult for me when it comes to engagement (our blog is our next phase for sm), partially because I can’t comment on other people’s pages from my organization’s page (ie I show up as my personal admin account that doesn’t lead back to our organization’s page) and partially because its difficult to interact on blogs and convert that conversation to the FB platform.

    While I think that focusing on one platform at a time was smart in some respects, at this stage, I think our overall strategy would be easier if we had more than one platform for engagement.

    I’d be real interested in hearing how other people conceptualize their Twitter versus their Facebook strategies. Thanks again for the insightful reply.

    Noah Goodman

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Noah – Facebook IS a really hard platform for engagement – and it’s also a hard platform to grow. One other frustration is inviting folks to become fans – unless you have an email list, it’s impossible for a Page to invite individuals to become fans. This feature makes it hard to “grow” a Facebook Page without lots of different ways to drive folks to the page (multiple driving paths, if you will allow, are necessary to drive folks to the Page). One example I really like is how the Lupus Foundation of America uses Causes – it’s their “action center” – not just a place for raising money. I’ve always thought that this is a great way to us the Page as well.
    Hoping others will comment on all you’ve offered. Really glad you stopped by, and are extending this blog post so well with your comments!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.facebook.com/globallanguageproject Noah Goodman

    Debra,

    Thanks a bunch for the reply, this has been a question on my mind for a bit now.

    As for how we use FB and Twitter at Global Language Project (my org), we have a Facebook account but not Twitter. We just recently launched our social media campaign and decided to take things one platform at a time so that we could focus on doing a good job at each and we also decided to focus on the objectives rather than the tools (ie not taking up specific tools until we have a specific rationale for it is going to help us advance our objective/mission).

    We currently use our FB page to post articles related to our cause and updates about what is going on with our organization, but we’re in a constant discussion about what else we can be doing to make it richer and more engaging. I really liked your description of FB as a website with discussion. I feel like it pegged how I’ve been feeling about FB lately. Having FB and nothing else has been difficult for me when it comes to engagement (our blog is our next phase for sm), partially because I can’t comment on other people’s pages from my organization’s page (ie I show up as my personal admin account that doesn’t lead back to our organization’s page) and partially because its difficult to interact on blogs and convert that conversation to the FB platform.

    While I think that focusing on one platform at a time was smart in some respects, at this stage, I think our overall strategy would be easier if we had more than one platform for engagement.

    I’d be real interested in hearing how other people conceptualize their Twitter versus their Facebook strategies. Thanks again for the insightful reply.

    Noah Goodman

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Noah – Facebook IS a really hard platform for engagement – and it’s also a hard platform to grow. One other frustration is inviting folks to become fans – unless you have an email list, it’s impossible for a Page to invite individuals to become fans. This feature makes it hard to “grow” a Facebook Page without lots of different ways to drive folks to the page (multiple driving paths, if you will allow, are necessary to drive folks to the Page). One example I really like is how the Lupus Foundation of America uses Causes – it’s their “action center” – not just a place for raising money. I’ve always thought that this is a great way to us the Page as well.
    Hoping others will comment on all you’ve offered. Really glad you stopped by, and are extending this blog post so well with your comments!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.melindaklewis.com/ melinda lewis

    Debra, this is SO helpful. I really appreciate how you shared your analysis, of a real case, to explain the impact (or not) behind the numbers. Can you share some more details about how you did the Twitter and Facebook analysis? I’m assuming that the FB analysis was really just looking at comments and ‘likes’, but I’m unfamiliar with the Twitter tools you mentioned. Thanks so much for this!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Happily, Melinda. For Facebook, I looked at the Facebook Page Insights fan gains and losses. That told a trending story. Insights also gives you the number of “reactions” each week. I also went back and looked at the # of “likes” and wall comments. I gave the organization the names of the people who were commenting or liking a post, and asked if these people were related to the company in any way. Most were friends of the staff, so I discounted those people. I consider “likes” a very passive form of Facebook engagement, and discount that type of involvement from the higher-engaged wall posts or wall comments.

    For Twitter, Twerpscan is really helpful to cull out spammers. I use it periodically myself and am always surprised at the few I didn’t block. I take Twitalyzer with a grain of salt, but it is a type of measurement, and use Twazzup to look at which followers engaged with RTs or replies. Twazzup is also great for saved Twitter searches, and it tells you the most actively engaged followers as well.

    Glad the piece was helpful – and thanks for commenting.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.melindaklewis.com melinda lewis

    Debra, this is SO helpful. I really appreciate how you shared your analysis, of a real case, to explain the impact (or not) behind the numbers. Can you share some more details about how you did the Twitter and Facebook analysis? I’m assuming that the FB analysis was really just looking at comments and ‘likes’, but I’m unfamiliar with the Twitter tools you mentioned. Thanks so much for this!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Happily, Melinda. For Facebook, I looked at the Facebook Page Insights fan gains and losses. That told a trending story. Insights also gives you the number of “reactions” each week. I also went back and looked at the # of “likes” and wall comments. I gave the organization the names of the people who were commenting or liking a post, and asked if these people were related to the company in any way. Most were friends of the staff, so I discounted those people. I consider “likes” a very passive form of Facebook engagement, and discount that type of involvement from the higher-engaged wall posts or wall comments.

    For Twitter, Twerpscan is really helpful to cull out spammers. I use it periodically myself and am always surprised at the few I didn’t block. I take Twitalyzer with a grain of salt, but it is a type of measurement, and use Twazzup to look at which followers engaged with RTs or replies. Twazzup is also great for saved Twitter searches, and it tells you the most actively engaged followers as well.

    Glad the piece was helpful – and thanks for commenting.

    [Reply]

  • http://icontactwebdesign.com/ Fran Jeanes

    Twitter definitely is about how many listeners you have. Have followers that don’t listen is like having a website with a high bounce rate – you get the visitors but they don’t actually want what you have. But with websites people leave in a hurry and your stats show you that; it’s a lot easier to be complacent with your twitter account and never purge followers, and simply let your ego tell you you have listeners.

    I often go through and purge followers from my account. I do not want people ‘at my party’ that I have nothing in common with. And, like at a party, you can’t just stand against a wall by yourself and expect everyone to notice you – twitter has to be about building relationships with people, not offering up barrages of self-promotional tweets.

    Thanks for the post, I enjoyed it.

    Fran.

    [Reply]

  • http://icontactwebdesign.com Fran Jeanes

    Twitter definitely is about how many listeners you have. Have followers that don’t listen is like having a website with a high bounce rate – you get the visitors but they don’t actually want what you have. But with websites people leave in a hurry and your stats show you that; it’s a lot easier to be complacent with your twitter account and never purge followers, and simply let your ego tell you you have listeners.

    I often go through and purge followers from my account. I do not want people ‘at my party’ that I have nothing in common with. And, like at a party, you can’t just stand against a wall by yourself and expect everyone to notice you – twitter has to be about building relationships with people, not offering up barrages of self-promotional tweets.

    Thanks for the post, I enjoyed it.

    Fran.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.communityorganizer20.com/ Debra Askanase

    Thanks to Bunnie Riedel of Riedel Communications who, with my permission, graciously re-posted this on her blog: http://www.nonprofitconversation.blogspot.com/

    [Reply]

  • http://www.communityorganizer20.com Debra Askanase

    Thanks to Bunnie Riedel of Riedel Communications who, with my permission, graciously re-posted this on her blog: http://www.nonprofitconversation.blogspot.com/

    [Reply]

  • http://www.pokethebeehive.com/ Dan Hutson

    I’m so glad you shared this experience, Debra. The whole follower/following measure on Twitter is pretty much meaningless when you can have thousands of followers without posting a single tweet.

    The difference between my 1,600-plus followers (most of whom I follow back) and some online marketeer’s 50,000 followers is that they follow me and I them because we have something of value to share with one another.

    I’d love to see someone do what you did with some of the big names on Twitter. And I can’t wait until some genius comes up with a way to analyze/measure the quality of one’s Twitter community. THAT would be amazingly useful.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    GREAT comment about analyzing some of the big names of Twitter. I don’t even bother following most of them because they don’t interact. (But you know who really does? @scobleizer – ask him a direct question and he’ll respond.)

    One caveat: I think Dunbar’s number really comes into play on Twitter more than anywhere else. How many people can we really interact with? The best we can hope to do when there’s over 200 followers is to interact sporadically with many, and deeply with a lower amount. That’s a huge challenge on the platform.

    As for analyzing the quality of one’s Twitter community objectively, that’s obviously a great gauntlet you’ve thrown down. My quick thought is – measure quality by whether or not the community acts when asked. Will they visit a site? Make a donation? Send a note? Click on a link? Each Twitterer has his/her own metrics for this, but it’s one way I look at how engaged a Twitter community is, and how valuable they are to a brand/organization/person. Your thoughts?

    [Reply]

  • http://www.pokethebeehive.com Dan Hutson

    I’m so glad you shared this experience, Debra. The whole follower/following measure on Twitter is pretty much meaningless when you can have thousands of followers without posting a single tweet.

    The difference between my 1,600-plus followers (most of whom I follow back) and some online marketeer’s 50,000 followers is that they follow me and I them because we have something of value to share with one another.

    I’d love to see someone do what you did with some of the big names on Twitter. And I can’t wait until some genius comes up with a way to analyze/measure the quality of one’s Twitter community. THAT would be amazingly useful.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    GREAT comment about analyzing some of the big names of Twitter. I don’t even bother following most of them because they don’t interact. (But you know who really does? @scobleizer – ask him a direct question and he’ll respond.)

    One caveat: I think Dunbar’s number really comes into play on Twitter more than anywhere else. How many people can we really interact with? The best we can hope to do when there’s over 200 followers is to interact sporadically with many, and deeply with a lower amount. That’s a huge challenge on the platform.

    As for analyzing the quality of one’s Twitter community objectively, that’s obviously a great gauntlet you’ve thrown down. My quick thought is – measure quality by whether or not the community acts when asked. Will they visit a site? Make a donation? Send a note? Click on a link? Each Twitterer has his/her own metrics for this, but it’s one way I look at how engaged a Twitter community is, and how valuable they are to a brand/organization/person. Your thoughts?

    [Reply]

  • http://www.mattsmedia.ca/ MattsMedia

    I gotta say I’ve very impressed with this article. Well organized and to the point, I’ll be back for more reading. Thanks for sharing.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Nice to meet you here, Matt. I do hope you’ll come back and share your thoughts – feel free to drop by anytime!

    [Reply]

  • http://www.mattsmedia.ca MattsMedia

    I gotta say I’ve very impressed with this article. Well organized and to the point, I’ll be back for more reading. Thanks for sharing.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Nice to meet you here, Matt. I do hope you’ll come back and share your thoughts – feel free to drop by anytime!

    [Reply]

  • Phil Evans

    Well said. I work in the radio industry and so many “old school” execs in this field still use sm tools the same way they use their radio towers – to broadcast.

    I love good analysis. Well done.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Phil- wonderful reminder about broadcasting vs. conversation. So true! And, btw, nice to see you here!

    [Reply]

  • Phil Evans

    Well said. I work in the radio industry and so many “old school” execs in this field still use sm tools the same way they use their radio towers – to broadcast.

    I love good analysis. Well done.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Phil- wonderful reminder about broadcasting vs. conversation. So true! And, btw, nice to see you here!

    [Reply]

  • Phil Evans

    Well said. I work in the radio industry and so many “old school” execs in this field still use sm tools the same way they use their radio towers – to broadcast.

    I love good analysis. Well done.

    [Reply]

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  • http://twitter.com/katzpdx Jeff Katz

    Excellent post. I am a firm believer of quality over quantity when it comes the number of people I follow and who follows me.

    Now a question for you. What did you mean by “I take Twitalyzer with a grain of salt”? We are continuing to enhance our solution – in fact we just pushed out a whole bunch new features over the past two weeks. Would love your feedback (either here or you have my email)

    [Reply]

  • http://twitter.com/katzpdx Jeff Katz

    Excellent post. I am a firm believer of quality over quantity when it comes the number of people I follow and who follows me.

    Now a question for you. What did you mean by “I take Twitalyzer with a grain of salt”? We are continuing to enhance our solution – in fact we just pushed out a whole bunch new features over the past two weeks. Would love your feedback (either here or you have my email)

    [Reply]

  • http://www.activerain.com/blogs/momentum Anna Matsunaga

    I love this, good information. I have been a little worried that I do not have more friends on Facebook yet (I’ve been on for year but have just 200 or so friends) However everyone on my facebook is someone I know and I actually WANT to know what is going on in their lives and want them to know whats going on with me….I also do have lots of commenting going on and such on it so I am doing what I should be doing.

    Not sure about twitter, I do not know most of the folks following me and not sure what prompted the following. I am working on regulary posting something of interest, but would like more of a strategy there.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.activerain.com/blogs/momentum Anna Matsunaga

    I love this, good information. I have been a little worried that I do not have more friends on Facebook yet (I’ve been on for year but have just 200 or so friends) However everyone on my facebook is someone I know and I actually WANT to know what is going on in their lives and want them to know whats going on with me….I also do have lots of commenting going on and such on it so I am doing what I should be doing.

    Not sure about twitter, I do not know most of the folks following me and not sure what prompted the following. I am working on regulary posting something of interest, but would like more of a strategy there.

    [Reply]

  • http://blockbranding.com/ Carolyn

    Just brilliant. So straight forward. ’bout time someone said this. I am so sick of clients wanting “500 followers in the first month” rather than “engaged clients” – this post is going directly to them. Thanks again.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Thanks, Carolyn! I certainly battle this expectation from clients as well, and now at least I have a real story to share with them when they ask me for 1000 followers in the next few months. Hope your clients get the message: quality over quantity! Stop by again and let me know how they take it – would love to know their reactions to this story.

    [Reply]

  • http://blockbranding.com Carolyn

    Just brilliant. So straight forward. ’bout time someone said this. I am so sick of clients wanting “500 followers in the first month” rather than “engaged clients” – this post is going directly to them. Thanks again.

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Thanks, Carolyn! I certainly battle this expectation from clients as well, and now at least I have a real story to share with them when they ask me for 1000 followers in the next few months. Hope your clients get the message: quality over quantity! Stop by again and let me know how they take it – would love to know their reactions to this story.

    [Reply]

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  • http://twtrcoach.com/ Are Morch

    Absolutely a brilliant article here Debra!

    I truly wished I read this about 8000 followers ago.

    But have started a new Twitter account where I partially have in some way started to implement some of the content you posted here.

    You gave me an abundance of new and creative ideas to work with.

    What gift of an article to discover now when it gets close to Christmas and I can start renew my Social Media Plans for next year.

    Your article is of course bookmarked, will be retweeted. And I will give a quality follow on Twitter…

    Cheers your friend Are … :)

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Are, thanks so much for your kind comments! I look forward to hearing about your Social Media Plans for the coming year, and how this inspired you. Check back in!

    [Reply]

  • http://twtrcoach.com Are Morch

    Absolutely a brilliant article here Debra!

    I truly wished I read this about 8000 followers ago.

    But have started a new Twitter account where I partially have in some way started to implement some of the content you posted here.

    You gave me an abundance of new and creative ideas to work with.

    What gift of an article to discover now when it gets close to Christmas and I can start renew my Social Media Plans for next year.

    Your article is of course bookmarked, will be retweeted. And I will give a quality follow on Twitter…

    Cheers your friend Are … :)

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Are, thanks so much for your kind comments! I look forward to hearing about your Social Media Plans for the coming year, and how this inspired you. Check back in!

    [Reply]

  • David

    Thanks for this, it serves further in my efforts to get my CEO to engage in social networking. Funnily enough I’ve tweeted him to hammer the point home.

    Wonderful Post.

    [Reply]

  • David

    Thanks for this, it serves further in my efforts to get my CEO to engage in social networking. Funnily enough I’ve tweeted him to hammer the point home.

    Wonderful Post.

    [Reply]

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  • http://www.weejeemedia.com/ Ian Huckabee

    Love your observations. Wonderfully conveyed. Adapting an organization’s message to social media is clear-cut for those who understand the various platforms but difficult to teach to those who aren’t so familiar.

    You’re so right: engagement is everything. For my clients who are big on big numbers, I insist on initiating or joining new conversations at certain benchmarks just to keep everyone engaged!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Ian-
    Thanks for stopping by and commenting. I really like your idea of initiating or joining new conversation at certain benchmarks just to keep everyone engaged. It’s a great practice, and one I will recommend as well. Look forward to seeing you again here – your ideas are more than welcome.

    [Reply]

  • http://www.weejeemedia.com Ian Huckabee

    Love your observations. Wonderfully conveyed. Adapting an organization’s message to social media is clear-cut for those who understand the various platforms but difficult to teach to those who aren’t so familiar.

    You’re so right: engagement is everything. For my clients who are big on big numbers, I insist on initiating or joining new conversations at certain benchmarks just to keep everyone engaged!

    [Reply]

    Debra Askanase Reply:

    Hi Ian-
    Thanks for stopping by and commenting. I really like your idea of initiating or joining new conversation at certain benchmarks just to keep everyone engaged. It’s a great practice, and one I will recommend as well. Look forward to seeing you again here – your ideas are more than welcome.

    [Reply]

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